Is online shopping making you FAT?




Expert says buying groceries from the comfort of your couch means you make unhealthier choices.

  • Online shopping from supermarkets has become more popular in recent years
  • But a dietitian says that ordering online could be leading to weight gain
  • Allan Borushek said that many products online don’t have nutritional labels
  • This means people are making unhealthier choices with their food 

While online grocery shopping is very convenient for the time poor, it could be bad news for your waistline and your wallet.

Not only could buying your food only be leaving you with less money in the bank, it’s also probably making you fat.

That’s according to Australian dietitian Allan Borushek, who told NineCoach that people can make poorer decisions when shopping online.

Put down the computer: Shopping for your groceries online could be making you fat (stock image)

The main reason for this, he said, is because some retailers don’t show the nutritional information for many products on their online stores.

‘While in-store shoppers can readily check the nutrition info panels, online shoppers are not given this option for many of the in-house brands,’ Mr Borushek explained.

‘The non-availability of nutritional data online disadvantages online shoppers – particularly those who are unable to physically shop in-store.’

Better choices: A dietitian said that many products online don't contain nutritional information (stock image)

Better choices: A dietitian said that many products online don’t contain nutritional information.

This means that shoppers can’t compare items easily and find the healthier product, and are more likely to make unhealthy choices.

It also have implications for people with dietary requires, who are unable to check levels of sugar, salt and carbohydrates in individual items.

A spokesman for supermarket Woolworths told Coach that they plan to introduce nutritional information online in the ‘coming months’.

Coles, which currently does not provide nutritional information online for their home brand products, also told the publication they will add it in time.




Bad choices: Because of a lack of information online, people find it difficult to compare products to see which one is healthier

Bad choices: Because of a lack of information online, people find it difficult to compare products to see which one is healthier

Last year, Professor Dame Sally Davies, chief medical officer for England,  urged people to return to walk to the supermarket and carry bags home instead of shopping online, in a bid to boost health.

‘Everyone can become more active by making little changes to the things we do every day,’ she said.

‘If you can go for a run about the park – great. But if you are pushed for time, something is always better than nothing.’